You are here

Establishing a Long term Monitoring Plan for Hallandale Beach, Florida Nearshore Coral Reef Habitats.

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2020-06-15
Abstract:
The city of Hallandale Beach, Florida adopted the “Our Local Coral Reef Protection Ordinance” in June of 2019, with plans to restore their coastline and protect the community from future storm surges. Ordinance No. 2019 1- 011 added sections 5 to 8 in Chapter 13 "Health and Sanitation" of the city of Hallandale Beach code of ordinances, which outline strategies to protect and restore the resilience of the nearshore coral reef. Complex coral reef systems bring higher biodiversity and will raise the economic value of the reef to tourism. The length of Hallandale Beach shoreline is approximately 0.80mi (4200ft). Acropora cervicornis (Staghorn coral), a critically endanger species, is said to be found ½ mile off the coast of Hallandale Beach and is an important reef-building species to be monitored. This proposal will establish a long-term monitoring plan and baseline for the nearshore coral reef based on the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment (AGRRA) protocols. It will briefly outline procedures needed to accomplish the three different monitoring surveys and important indicators each SCUBA diver will be required to record. Corals are the primary builders of reef habitats and they benefit from the presence of reef fish and benthic organisms. Reef fish have different eating habits that promote positive structure changes such as, keeping turf algae in check clearing room for recruitment of polyps. Benthic promotors such as, crustose coralline algae and minimal turf algae encourage a healthy reef habitat. According to a map of Broward County, Florida reef structure created by Brain Walker, the linear reef inner begins about 0.80 mi (4200ft) and the liner reef middle ends at about 1.75mi (9240ft) from the shore. There appears to be no linear outer reef off the coast of Hallandale Beach. There is no previous baseline to compare future surveyed data or confirm presence and density of diver sighted Acropora cervicornis. Baselines are important historical data that enables the city to identify changes in the complexity of the reef structure and responses to climate change to make proactive decisions. An initial baseline of Hallandale’s reef will be made to be comparable with future monitoring data, as well as determine the effectiveness of the management plans in place. AGGRA protocols require a minimum of six divers and with the use of city vendors, equipment costs can be as low as 230 dollars. Without a coral reef, the city may face costly damages from natural disasters such as hurricanes. Coral Reefs provide protection against storm surges that without, coastal erosion would increase and leave the city without an offshore defense against high energy wave action. AGRRA protocols will be applied to create a basic level survey easily adaptable, this will provide community building and outreach opportunities through citizen science and volunteering.
Title: Establishing a Long term Monitoring Plan for Hallandale Beach, Florida Nearshore Coral Reef Habitats.
41 views
1 downloads
Name(s): Pollard, Madison Jane, creator
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Research Posters
Posters
Date Issued: 2020-06-15
Physical Form: electronic
Extent: 1 poster
Language(s): English
Abstract: The city of Hallandale Beach, Florida adopted the “Our Local Coral Reef Protection Ordinance” in June of 2019, with plans to restore their coastline and protect the community from future storm surges. Ordinance No. 2019 1- 011 added sections 5 to 8 in Chapter 13 "Health and Sanitation" of the city of Hallandale Beach code of ordinances, which outline strategies to protect and restore the resilience of the nearshore coral reef. Complex coral reef systems bring higher biodiversity and will raise the economic value of the reef to tourism. The length of Hallandale Beach shoreline is approximately 0.80mi (4200ft). Acropora cervicornis (Staghorn coral), a critically endanger species, is said to be found ½ mile off the coast of Hallandale Beach and is an important reef-building species to be monitored. This proposal will establish a long-term monitoring plan and baseline for the nearshore coral reef based on the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment (AGRRA) protocols. It will briefly outline procedures needed to accomplish the three different monitoring surveys and important indicators each SCUBA diver will be required to record. Corals are the primary builders of reef habitats and they benefit from the presence of reef fish and benthic organisms. Reef fish have different eating habits that promote positive structure changes such as, keeping turf algae in check clearing room for recruitment of polyps. Benthic promotors such as, crustose coralline algae and minimal turf algae encourage a healthy reef habitat. According to a map of Broward County, Florida reef structure created by Brain Walker, the linear reef inner begins about 0.80 mi (4200ft) and the liner reef middle ends at about 1.75mi (9240ft) from the shore. There appears to be no linear outer reef off the coast of Hallandale Beach. There is no previous baseline to compare future surveyed data or confirm presence and density of diver sighted Acropora cervicornis. Baselines are important historical data that enables the city to identify changes in the complexity of the reef structure and responses to climate change to make proactive decisions. An initial baseline of Hallandale’s reef will be made to be comparable with future monitoring data, as well as determine the effectiveness of the management plans in place. AGGRA protocols require a minimum of six divers and with the use of city vendors, equipment costs can be as low as 230 dollars. Without a coral reef, the city may face costly damages from natural disasters such as hurricanes. Coral Reefs provide protection against storm surges that without, coastal erosion would increase and leave the city without an offshore defense against high energy wave action. AGRRA protocols will be applied to create a basic level survey easily adaptable, this will provide community building and outreach opportunities through citizen science and volunteering.
Identifier: BC746 (IID)
Affiliation: Madison Jane Pollard. Broward College, undergraduate student.
Note(s): Poster presented to the Student Research Symposium Environmental Science event of the University/College Library’s annual Literary Festival on June 15, 2020.
The Student Research Symposium event of the University/College Library’s annual Literary Festival of 2020 was transitioned to a virtual setting due to COVID-19.
A project-based learning approach was implemented during the 2020 Spring semester in Dr. Pamela Fletcher’s Environmental Science courses where students created posters based on their research topics.
Subject(s): Broward College
Environmental sciences
Corals
Coral reef conservation
Benthos
Hallandale (Fla.)
Broward County (Fla.)
Florida
2020
Held by: Broward College Archives and Special Collections
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/broward/fd/BC746
Restrictions on Access: Copyright © Broward College. All rights reserved. Content is the property of Broward College and is protected by United States copyright and trademark laws. The content and text may not be copied, translated or distributed in any manner (electronic, web or printed) without the prior written consent of Broward College with the exception of properly-attributed quotations and other "fair use" exemptions provided for under copyright law. Poster content copyright is retained by the creator of content. Upon submission to Digital Archives Broward College Undergraduate Research Collection, creator attests that content submitted is their own original content.
Restrictions on Access: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: Broward